Glossary

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This is a glossary of terms used in embedded Linux, and links to existing glossary pages:

Topic-specific Glossaries

Here are pages that have list of terms for specific technology areas:

Contents
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Abatron 
Abatron is a Swiss company that makes a popular Jtag debugger often used to debug embedded Linux. Their primary products are the 'BDIx000' line of Jtag debuggers.

B

Board 
A board is used to refer to the hardware open which ones develops embedded Linux. Historically, it refers to the printed circuit board that actually holds the hardware for the device. Often, this is a development board, or evaluation board, as opposed to an actual product device in final shipping form.
BSP 
Board Support Package. This is the code that is used to support a particular hardware board. The term is used generically to refer to code, and not a specific "package", as the name implies. It generally refers to all special-case software relevant to a particular board, whether it is kernel code, user code, etc.

C

D

E

ELC 
Embedded Linux Conference. This is one of the major technical conferences each year for developers of embedded Linux. See the Events page for references to past events.
embedded 
An "Embedded" device usually means one with fixed functionality, independent of other additional hardware or software attributes. The terms is somewhat vague. This is as opposed to general-purpose functionality. Note that mobile phones are considered embedded, although they now support general-purpose programs and functionality. Classic embedded Linux products include things like digital cameras, routers, television sets, and settop boxes, as well as non-consumer embedded devices like sensors, industrial control devices, and pretty much anything running Linux outside of the desktop and server markets. See the wikipedia entry for Embedded system

F

G

H

host 
The host, or 'host machine' is the place where the software developer actually writes and compiles the software for their product. In a host-target environment, the host is used to develop software, and the target is the device which will run the software.

I

J

JTAG 
Short for "Joint Test Action Group", JTAG refers to a debugging interface used to validate hardware and debug software on an embedded board. See JTAG

K

kernel 
The Linux kernel is the core software in a Linux system that interfaces with the hardware, manages resources on behalf of processes, and mediates interactions between processes and the hardware, and between processes themselves.

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

target 
Target refers to the device or environment for which software is being developed. This can be a development board, an actual product, or an emulator. Often, software is developed on a 'host' and then transferred to a target device for testing, debugging and deployment.

U

V

W

X

Y

Z