Difference between revisions of "RPi Easy SD Card Setup"

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(Easyiest way)
(Easyiest way)
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When you write the Raspberry Pi image to your SD card you will lose all data that was on the card.
 
When you write the Raspberry Pi image to your SD card you will lose all data that was on the card.
=Easyiest way=
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=Easiest way=
  
 
Download and run the PiCard tool. It will guide you through the progress.
 
Download and run the PiCard tool. It will guide you through the progress.

Revision as of 09:45, 4 March 2012


To boot the Raspberry Pi, you need an SD card installed with a bootloader provided by the foundation, and a suitable Operating System.

Official images are available from http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads. This guide assumes you have downloaded the Debian "squeeze" image.

When you write the Raspberry Pi image to your SD card you will lose all data that was on the card.

Easiest way

Download and run the PiCard tool. It will guide you through the progress.

PiCard is currently being developed , and aims to make creation of bootable SD cards for the Pi easy. See the google code repo and the forum discussion.

Easy way

Copying the image to an SD Card on Windows

  1. Extract the image file debian6-17-02-2012.img from the debian6-17-02-2012 directory in the debian6-17-02-2012.zip
  2. Insert the SD card into your SD card reader and check what drive letter it was assigned.
  3. Download the Win32DiskImager utility. The download links are on the right hand side of the page, you want the binary zip.
  4. Extract the zip file and run the Win32DiskImager utility.
  5. Select the debian6-17-02-2012.img image file you extracted earlier
  6. Select the drive letter of the SD card in the device box. Be careful to select the correct drive.
  7. Click Write and wait for the write to complete.
  8. Exit the imager and eject the SD card.
  9. Insert the card in the Raspberry Pi, power it on, and it should boot up. Have fun!

Copying an image to the SD Card in Max OS

  1. Download the image from a mirror or torrent
  2. Verify if the the hash key is the same (optional), in the terminal run:
    • shasum ~/Downloads/debian6-17-02-2012.zip
  3. Extract the image, just double click the zip, it will extract automatically
  4. From the terminal run df -h
  5. Connect the sdcard reader with the sdcard inside
  6. Run df -h again and look for the new device that wasn't listed last time. Record the filesystem name of the device, e.g. /dev/disk1s1
  7. Open disk utility and unmount the partition of the sdcard (do not eject it, or you have to reconnect it)
  8. In the terminal write the image to the card with this command, making sure you replace "/dev/disk1" with the right device name from before, but missing out the final "s1".
    • dd bs=1m if=~/Downloads/debian6-17-02-2012/debian6-17-02-2012.img of=/dev/disk1
  9. After the dd comand finishes go to disk utility and eject the sdcard
  10. Insert it in the raspberry pi, and have fun

Copying an image to the SD Card in Linux

  1. Download the image from a mirror or torrent
  2. Verify if the the hash key is the same (optional), in the terminal run:
    • shasum ~/debian6-17-02-2012.zip
  3. Extract the image, with
    • unzip ~/debian6-17-02-2012.zip
  4. Connect the sdcard reader with the sdcard inside
  5. Check the name of the device that the SD card was mounted as by running: dmesg | tail, it will be something like "/dev/sdc"
  6. In the terminal write the image to the card with this command, making sure you replace "/dev/sdc" with the right device name.
    • dd bs=1M if=~/debian6-17-02-2012/debian6-17-02-2012.img of=/dev/sdc
  7. Insert it in the raspberry pi, and have fun